Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

 Edition 57

Newsletter Home
Reportable Conduct Scheme for Victorian schools

As of 1 July 2017 all Victorian school principals will be required to bring allegations of reportable conduct by employees to the Commission for Children and Young People.

An allegation of reportable conduct is where a person has a reasonable belief that there has been:

  • a sexual offence (even prior to criminal proceedings commencing), sexual misconduct or physical violence committed against, with or in the presence of a child
  • behaviour causing significant emotional or psychological harm
  • significant neglect of a child.

 

What is changing?

  • School principals will have a responsibility to report any allegations of misconduct that may include reportable conduct to the CCYP within three days of becoming aware of the allegation.
  • School principals will need to notify the CCYP of all allegations of conduct that may involve reportable conduct by employees, contractors, volunteers, allied health staff and school council employees.

  

What is not changing?

  • Principals' responsibilities to manage employee misconduct will not change.
  • The Reportable Conduct Scheme does not change a principal's mandatory reporting and other reporting obligations. Principals must contact Victoria Police if they suspect a criminal offence has occurred involving a child.

 

Government schools

  • Government school principals do not need to make a report directly to the CCYP. When an allegation is reported, the Employee Conduct Branch will provide advice and support to principals on how to manage the matter and will report the allegation to the CCYP (if appropriate).
  • The process for government schools was communicated in the DET School Update, 2 May 2017.

Following the Betrayal of Trust Report, the Victorian Government passed legislation in February 2017 to introduce a Reportable Conduct Scheme in Victoria. The Reportable Conduct Scheme complements the child safe standards and other existing child safety measures.

For more information visit the Commission for Children and Young People.