Language learning at home

Here are some practical ideas to help get you started.If you haven’t learnt a language before, including one in your educational program might seem difficult. But it doesn’t need to be!

Like all learning areas, your approach can be flexible depending on what suits your family. The following ideas may help.

Be specific about the what

When writing your learning plan, it’s important to include subject matter. You should identify the language and provide specific content and the names of resources you will use.

For example: 'We will learn Italian using Languages Online. We will learn greetings and names of household items, use simple phrases such as ‘What’s for dinner?’ and learn to say, read and write numbers from 1–10.'

Find outside-the-box opportunities

General exposure to a language could be a great introduction to a foreign language.

  • watching a subtitled film or TV program
  • listening to music in languages other than English
  • visiting cultural centres and learning local Aboriginal words.

Consider getting help

If a member of your extended family knows a language other than English, this could be an opportunity to get them involved. Many families learn a new language together – make a family project of it and have fun!

You might also consider engaging a tutor or coach for this specific learning area. Alternatively, you could investigate enrolling your child at an accredited community language school.

Consider sign language

Of course, this learning area doesn’t need to only include a spoken language. Auslan (Australian sign language) is a popular choice if families don’t already have a background in another language.

Try online resources

Our collection of resources is a good starting point if you’re not sure where to begin: